Theme:

Keeping Journalism Alive in times of uncertainty

About the
2020 Expo

The 2020 Media Challenge Expo was meant to discuss the state of journalism amidst the covid-19 pandemic, and all its accompanying implications on the media industry. Prior to the pandemic, journalism was already dealing with aggressive authoritarian regimes, trust and credibility as well as a looming economic crisis that raised questions on media viability or sustainability of quality journalism.

Solution Journalism

The Expo offers expertise on reporting that responds to social problems, and factors everyday people in editorial decisions

Virtual Summit

We are keeping journalism alive in a period of uncertainty. Due to the Coronavirus pandemic, the Media Challenge Expo has been held online. Register to join the network

Opportunity

We invite media managers and owners to identify talent, and recruit from competing students in the Inter-Institutional Media Challenge

Network Place

Every year, we assemble captains of industry and aspiring journalists as a way of creating career networks that nurture talent and build professional capacity

What Happened

The Media Challenge Expo offered nuggets in improving editorial and journalistic response to events, trends, and core challenges of media fraternity. Given the wealth of expertise of the speakers, the event was a fertile ground to cultivate knowledge on a wide range of subjects, and also build connection and belonging for both media practitioners and friends of journalism.
 

Save your seat for the next Media Expo.

Grab your place while they last we have a limited number available

9.30 - 10.30 AM Workshop

One-on-one pitching sessions for Media Challenge Fellows with media house recruiters !

speaker-1

Media managers

10.00 - 10.45 AM Workshop

Pre-conference shows and discussions in the MCI studio broadcasted live on MCI Facebook and YouTube

speaker-1

Nwali Rahim

speaker-2

Ssebandeke Joseph

11.00 - 12.30 PM Workshop

Media Viability and New Revenue Business Models to Keep Journalism Alive

One of the most affected sectors by the Covid-19 economic crisis was the media. When lockdowns hit, media houses lost their major sources of revenue - advertising and subscribers - and many closed, laid off staff or cut salaries. This was just the latest blow to the industry, which has suffered with declining sales and revenues for years. In such an environment, how can the media and journalists remain viable to continue their important work of informing the public? Which models are working in Uganda, Africa and internationally to support journalists’ welfare and the business of media, and what are their implications on content and ethics? This session will explore new media revenue generation models, innovations and strategies that are being explored in Uganda and abroad to help the media remain viable. It will also look at new challenges and opportunities to media viability being afforded by the Covid-19 crisis and the world going online.

speaker-1

Njoki Chege

speaker-2

Bill Silcock

speaker-3

Songa Stone

speaker-4

Gerald Businge

speaker-5

Eva Georgia

speaker-6

Joe Kigozi

12.30 - 01.00 PM Follow-up discussion

Follow-up discussions in the MCI studio broadcasted live

speaker-1

Nwali Rahim

speaker-2

Ssebandeke Joseph

03.30 - 04.30 PM Workshop

Skills building workshop session for students: Public Relations and Personal Branding and Photojournalism

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to wreak havoc around the globe, we have all come to learn one key lesson, that now more than ever in the history of global crises, communicators are essential in the fight against COVID-19. A lot of communication has focused on how to stop the spread of the virus, with companies strengthening the WHO and government guidelines in containing the virus. However, there is more to this that communication and public relations professionals should be focusing on right now in the days of COVID-19. Can your communication and PR strategy continue business as usual or do you need to change game? What PR strategies should we be investing in? How are companies preparing and communicating life after COVID19? In an uncertain and viral landscape, any wrong turn can hurt your reputation, as journalists and people on social media are following any public relations mistakes and scandals. It is also important to reflect on how brands continue to build and exist in a pandemic. How can we build brand resilience in times of COVID-19? How should people remember your brand after COVID-19? How can your brand bounce back after a crisis? Can you pivot your brand to help now?

 

speaker-1

Flavia K Tumusiime

11.00 - 12.30 PM Panel Discussion

Keeping Journalism Alive! Flattening the Curve of Mis(dis)information and mis(dis)trust through journalism, fact checking and media literacy

During the Covid-19 ‘infodemic,’ a mass of information, misinformation and disinformation has circulated in our media spaces, sometimes with dangerous impacts. What impacts has this mis/disinformation had in the public? How have journalists dealt with the rise in mis/disinformation in a time when credible and accurate information is most needed? What is the role of fact checking, and how effective have various fact checking platforms been? What is the role of media literacy, and are there examples of various media literacy capacity building programs that have made a difference?

speaker-1

Ibrahim Bbossa

speaker-2

Cayley Clifford,

speaker-3

Dapo Olorunyomi

speaker-4

Sandra kahumuza

9.00 – 10:00 AM Pitching Sessions

One-on-one pitching sessions for Media Challenge Fellows with media house recruiters

10:00– 10:45AM Pre-conference show

Pre-conference shows and discussions in the MCI studio broadcasted live on MCI Facebook and YouTube

speaker-1

Dan Ayebale

12:30 – 1:00PM Follow-up discussions

Follow-up discussions in the MCI studio broadcasted live

speaker-1

Raymond Mpubani

2.00 - 4.00 PM Workshop

Skills building workshop session for students: Fighting the Infodemic: Fact Checking Tools and Strategies

During Covid-19, a mass of information, misinformation and disinformation has circulated in our media spaces, sometimes with dangerous impacts. Fact-checking is one way for journalists to combat this so-called ‘infodemic.’ This session will empower young journalists in fact checking tools and strategies to help them combat the rise of “fake news.” Various fact checking tools will be shared, such as image and video verification, social media account analysis, and other online investigative tools and resources. Participants should learn how to apply elements of fact-checking to their day-to-day reporting as journalists

speaker-1

Eric Mugendi

09.00 - 11.30 AM Workshop

#MCIZoomPitch: One-on-one pitching sessions for Media Challenge Fellows with media house recruiters

speaker-1

Media managers

10.00 - 10.30 AM Seminar

Pre-conference shows and discussions in the MCI studio broadcasted live on MCI Facebook and YouTube

speaker-1

Dan Ayebale

11.00 - 12.30 PM Panel Discussion

Keeping Journalism Alive: Effective, Ethical and Solutions-based Reporting on the pandemic in a time of elections

speaker-1

Daniel Lutaya

speaker-2

Raymond Mpubani

speaker-3

Julia Hotz

12.30 - 01.30 PM Workshop

Follow-up discussions in the MCI studio broadcasted live

speaker-1

Dan Ayebale

2.00 - 4.00 PM Workshop

Skills building workshop session for students: Covid-19 and Health Reporting

speaker-1

Walter Mwesigye

9.00 – 10:00 AM Pitching Sessions

One-on-one pitching sessions for Media Challenge Fellows with media house recruiters

10.00 - 10.45 AM Workshop

Pre-conference shows and discussions in the MCI studio broadcasted live on MCI Facebook and YouTube

speaker-1

Ursher Kulusum

11.00 - 12.30 PM Panel Discussion

Beyond the Headlines: Unreported, underreported and Ignored issues and stories

The business of media, dominant cultures, censorship and discrimination inevitably leaves gaps in the way certain topics or groups of people are covered in the media. As revenue has shrunk, media houses have also been forced to close regional offices and lay off specialist reporters, worsening the lack of diversity and inclusion in coverage. This session will look critically at media coverage in Uganda and across Africa, identifying important gaps in reporting. Which topics and groups of people are critically ignored, under-reported or presented through unfair stereotypes, and what are the underlying reasons why? What have been the effects of this type of reporting? What are emerging platforms and examples of journalists in Africa who have covered under-reported stories well, and which lessons can we learn from them?

 

speaker-1

Caleb Okereke,

speaker-2

Carol Ariba

speaker-3

Carol Beyanga

speaker-4

Kemi Falodun

12.30 - 01.00 PM Follow-up discussion

Follow-up discussions in the MCI studio broadcasted live

speaker-1

Ursher Kulusum

2.00 - 4.00 PM Workshop

Crafting Digital News Campaigns: Social Media for Journalists and Basic Visualization Tools

In our 21st century digital world, social media is not only used to enhance communication, but is also increasingly becoming the primary source of news for people around the globe. Social media cuts across borders, easily connecting people from different backgrounds and places around shared themes and interests. But on social media where attention spans are fleeting, it is critical for journalists to know how to attract immediate interest and “shareability” on their stories or news updates. Journalists should also know how to avoid creating or spreading “fake news” in an era when news is often broken on social media. This session will empower students with basic knowledge of different social media platforms (including Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram) and strategies for publishing both breaking news updates and attracting attention to longer-term stories on the various platforms. The session will equip participants with top tools and resources to learn how to use social media to amplify their work along with examples of successful social media campaigns. Attendees will also learn the basics of various visualization tools for social media, such as Canva and Crello.

speaker-1

Edwin Danze

9.00 – 10:00 AM Pitching Sessions

One-on-one pitching sessions for Media Challenge Fellows with media house recruiters

speaker-1

Media managers

10.00 - 10.45 AM Workshop

Pre-conference shows and discussions in the MCI studio broadcasted live on MCI Facebook and YouTube

speaker-1

Andrew Onen

speaker-2

Yvonne Njuna

11.00 - 12.30 PM Panel Discussion

Keeping Journalism Alive: Journalists safety and abuse of media freedoms during a time of Covid-19 and elections

Worldwide, press freedom is declining and journalists are under attack. Authoritarianism has re-emerged in many societies as the world faces corresponding health, economic and environmental crises, often to the detriment of free speech and information. During the Covid-19 pandemic, journalists have been denied access or information due to the classification of the virus as an issue of national security. Lockdowns have sometimes been used as an excuse to repress journalists and free speech. The corresponding election season has only made the problems worse. How have journalists’ safety and the abuse of media freedoms been affected during this time of crisis? How can media houses and journalists uphold their rights to freedom of speech and information? What role does government, civil society and the general public play?

speaker-1

Jan Ajwang

speaker-2

Robert Sempala

speaker-3

Haruna Kanaabi

speaker-4

Stephen Ouma Bwire

speaker-5

Perez Rumanzi

speaker-6

James Akena

speaker-7

Mordecai Muriisa Martin

12.30 - 01.00 PM Follow-up discussion

Follow-up discussions in the MCI studio broadcasted live

speaker-1

Andrew Onen

speaker-2

Yvonne Njuna

EXPO GUEST SPEAKERS

Natascha Schwanke

DW Akademie Deputy Head

Ms. Ann Therese Ndong Jatta,

Director and Representative, UNESCO Regional Office for Eastern Africa

Miriam Ohlsen

Country Representative, DW Akademie Uganda

EXPO SPEAKERS AND FACILITATORS

MEDIA CHALLENGE EXPO PARTNERS

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